Shop Tax Free in Tennessee August 3-5

August Sales Tax Holiday Provides Big Savings for all Tennesseans

Nashville, Tenn. — The Department of Revenue is reminding Tennesseans that the seventh annual Sales Tax Holiday is scheduled for Friday, August 3 through Sunday, August 5. During these three days Tennessee shoppers can save nearly 10 percent on tax-free clothing, school and art supplies and computer purchases.

The holiday begins Friday, August 3 at 12:01 a.m. and ends Sunday, August 5 at 11:59 p.m. During the designated three-day weekend, consumers will not pay state or local sales tax on clothing with a price of $100 or less per item, school and art supplies with a price of $100 or less per item, and computers with a price of $1,500 or less.

www.tntaxholiday.com / Sales Tax Holidays begin on the first Friday in August each year at 12:01 a.m. and end at 11:59 p.m. the following Sunday.

Click the following links for details:  ClothingSchool SuppliesComputers/Electronics

View TN Official Waiver Letter to Commissioner Huffman Here – 02/09/12

Ten states got the green light Thursday to pursue school reforms without being tethered to the requirements of the federal No Child Left Behind law. At least 28 more are expected to seek similar approval by the end of the month.

  • President Obama heads to the stage with Education Secretary Arne Duncan, left, to speak about flexibility for states in the No Child Left Behind law at the White House Thursday.By Susan Walsh, APPresident Obama heads to the stage with Education Secretary Arne Duncan, left, to speak about flexibility for states in the No Child Left Behind law at the White House Thursday.
By Susan Walsh, AP

President Obama heads to the stage with Education Secretary Arne Duncan, left, to speak about flexibility for states in the No Child Left Behind law at the White House Thursday.

No Child Left Behind, signed into law in 2002 byPresident George W. Bush, was meant to improve fundamental skills of students. Under the law, schools that failed to meet requirements face increasingly tough consequences, including busing children to higher-performing schools, offering tutoring and replacing staff.

President Obama said Thursday the law is too punitive and driving the wrong behaviors. “If we’re serious about helping our children reach their potential, the best ideas aren’t going to come from Washington alone,” Obama said.

Seven of the states — Colorado, Indiana, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey and Tennessee — are waived from a deadline requiring that all students be proficient in reading and math by 2014. Three — Florida, Georgia and Oklahoma — received provisional waivers pending approval of the proposals by state authorities. New Mexico applied and was not approved but is expected also to be waived, Education Secretary Arne Duncan said.

To qualify, states must show they will prepare kids for colleges and careers, set new targets for improving achievement among all students, reward high-performing schools and help struggling schools.

Supporters say the greater flexibility for states honors the spirit of No Child Left Behind. “This is really not backing away from anything. These are going to be much more rigorous standards,” says Gene Wilhoit, executive director of the Council of Chief State School Officers, which represents state superintendents of education.

Amy Wilkins, of The Education Trust, which advocates for low-income and minority students, urged Duncan to hold schools accountable.

“The question is, did kids win?” she says. “We won’t know that until we see how it plays out in classrooms across the country.”

Contributing: Associated Press