USDA 1890 National Scholars Program

Application DEADLINE February 1, 2015
Please Note: Only 2015 USDA/1890 National Scholars Program Applications will be considered.
(Previous versions of the Scholars Program Application will not be considered.)

http://www.outreach.usda.gov/education/1890/

Program Overview

The USDA/1890 National Scholars Program is a partnership between of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the 1890 Historically Black Land-Grant Universities. The USDA/1890 National Scholars Program is implemented under the USDA Fellows Experience Program (FEP). Scholars accepted into the program will be appointed using the Schedule A(r) authority (5 CFR 213.3202) and are not eligible for noncompetitive conversion to full time employment upon graduation.

However, all USDA/1890 National Scholars are required to compete for appropriate employment immediately after graduation and, if selected, commit to at least one year of service to USDA for each year of financial assistance provided. (Note: Specific details of this service requirement will be outlined in the service agreement entered into by the selected Scholar, the University at which the Scholar is matriculated, and the USDA Sponsoring Agency.)

The USDA/1890 National Scholars Program will provide full tuition, employment, employee benefits, fees, books, and room and board each year for up to 4 years to selected students pursuing a bachelor’s degree at the following universities:

  • Alabama A&M University
  • Alcorn State University, Mississippi
  • Central State University, Ohio
  • Delaware State University
  • Florida A&M University
  • Fort Valley State University, Georgia
  • Kentucky State University
  • Langston University, Oklahoma
  • Lincoln University, Missouri
  • North Carolina A&T State University
  • Prairie View A&M University, Texas
  • South Carolina State University
  • Southern University, Louisiana
  • Tennessee State University
  • Tuskegee University, Alabama
  • University of Arkansas Pine Bluff
  • University of Maryland Eastern Shore
  • Virginia State University
  • West Virginia State University

Goal

The goal of the USDA/1890 National Scholars Program is to increase the number of minorities studying agriculture, food, natural resource sciences and the related disciplines. National Scholars are required to study in the following or related disciplines.

  • Agriculture
  • Agricultural Business/Management
  • Agricultural Economics
  • Agricultural Engineering/Mechanics
  • Agricultural Production and Technology
  • Agronomy or Crop Science
  • Animal Sciences
  • Botany
  • Food Sciences/Technology
  • Forestry and Related Sciences
  • Home Economics/Nutrition
  • Horticulture
  • Natural Resources Management
  • Soil Conservation/Soil Science
  • Farm and Range Management
  • Other related disciplines, (e.g. non-medical biological sciences, pre-veterinary medicine, computer science)

The Award
Scholarships are awarded annually and must be used at one of the 1890 Historically Black Land-Grant Universities. Each award provides full tuition, as well as room and board for the term of the scholarship. The scholarship may be renewed each year, contingent upon satisfactory academic performance and normal progress toward the bachelor’s degree.

General Eligibility
To be eligible for the USDA/1890 National Scholars Program scholarship a student must:

  • Be a U.S. citizen
  • Have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better (on a 4.0 scale)
  • Have been accepted for admission or currently attending one of the nineteen 1890 Historically Black Land-Grant Universities.
  • Study agriculture, food, natural resource sciences, or other related academic disciplines
  • Demonstrate leadership and community service
  • Submit an official transcript with the school seal and an authorized official’s signature
  • Submit a signed application (original signature only)

Who Should Apply
The USDA/1890 National Scholars Program is available to high school seniors entering their freshman year of college and rising college sophomores and juniors.

USDA 1890 National Scholars Program 2015 Application DEADLINE: February 1, 2015

All application materials must be postmarked by February 1, 2015 and sent to the university (or universities) selected by the applicant to attend. (University addresses and contact information are included in the back of the application.)

For any questions regarding the USDA/1890 National Scholars Program, please contact:

Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration
Office of Advocacy and Outreach
USDA/1890 Programs
1400 Independence Ave., S.W., Stop 0170
Washington, DC 20250
Telephone Number: (202) 205-4307
Fax Number: (202) 720-7136
Email: 1890init@usda.gov

View TN Official Waiver Letter to Commissioner Huffman Here – 02/09/12

Ten states got the green light Thursday to pursue school reforms without being tethered to the requirements of the federal No Child Left Behind law. At least 28 more are expected to seek similar approval by the end of the month.

  • President Obama heads to the stage with Education Secretary Arne Duncan, left, to speak about flexibility for states in the No Child Left Behind law at the White House Thursday.By Susan Walsh, APPresident Obama heads to the stage with Education Secretary Arne Duncan, left, to speak about flexibility for states in the No Child Left Behind law at the White House Thursday.
By Susan Walsh, AP

President Obama heads to the stage with Education Secretary Arne Duncan, left, to speak about flexibility for states in the No Child Left Behind law at the White House Thursday.

No Child Left Behind, signed into law in 2002 byPresident George W. Bush, was meant to improve fundamental skills of students. Under the law, schools that failed to meet requirements face increasingly tough consequences, including busing children to higher-performing schools, offering tutoring and replacing staff.

President Obama said Thursday the law is too punitive and driving the wrong behaviors. “If we’re serious about helping our children reach their potential, the best ideas aren’t going to come from Washington alone,” Obama said.

Seven of the states — Colorado, Indiana, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey and Tennessee — are waived from a deadline requiring that all students be proficient in reading and math by 2014. Three — Florida, Georgia and Oklahoma — received provisional waivers pending approval of the proposals by state authorities. New Mexico applied and was not approved but is expected also to be waived, Education Secretary Arne Duncan said.

To qualify, states must show they will prepare kids for colleges and careers, set new targets for improving achievement among all students, reward high-performing schools and help struggling schools.

Supporters say the greater flexibility for states honors the spirit of No Child Left Behind. “This is really not backing away from anything. These are going to be much more rigorous standards,” says Gene Wilhoit, executive director of the Council of Chief State School Officers, which represents state superintendents of education.

Amy Wilkins, of The Education Trust, which advocates for low-income and minority students, urged Duncan to hold schools accountable.

“The question is, did kids win?” she says. “We won’t know that until we see how it plays out in classrooms across the country.”

Contributing: Associated Press